Aberffraw Nature WalkAberffraw, Anglesey

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1

Descend the rough slipway onto the beach. If the tide is low, you can make a detour to explore the fantastic little church on its enticing island by crossing the beach and walking along the stony causeway.

The Old Church of St Cwfan
2

To continue around the headland, walk to the left of the beach, it is very rocky! The path is also being eroded, but you can see it along the fence-line.

Look for Sea Holly
3

Follow the grassy footpath around the headland, you are on the Anglesey Coastal Footpath. Hopefully the weather will be clear and you can enjoy lovely views across to the mountains of Snowdonia and the Llyn Peninsula.

Nature note
4

Next to a long, narrow gully in the cliffs is an old winch. Once a rich area for fishing, this winch was used to bring up the catches. Just beyond this is a beautiful cove with clear blue-green water, really gorgeous. (Photo Seal watch beach).

A seasonal treat
5

You will shortly arrive at the point of the headland, with extensive rocks stretching out into the sea (Braich-lwyd).

Birdwatchers take note
6

Turning left at this point, the footpath becomes enclosed by wind-pruned blackthorn hedges.

Nature note
7

Follow the Anglesey Coastal Footpath signs along this exhilarating stretch of coast. Each time you round a corner, the Aberffraw beach is a bit closer and more mountain views (of Snowdon and the Carneddau) are becoming visible.

8

At high tide, the next bit can be a bit tricky and can involve some clambering over rocks. Follow the waymarker onto and across the beach, at midpoint you can see where the original path has collapsed along with an old corrugated iron shed. If it’s low tide you can walk along the beach if the water is up and you don’t want to paddle there is a short few minutes clamber over these rocks  

Walkers tip
9

Beyond the rocks is a lovely sheltered beach. This is a good place to stop for coffee, a snack or picnic. I sat for a moment to enjoy this view and the sun sparkling off the sea. Alternatively, you can wait until the next headland with its spectacular beach views.

10

Walk through the wooden gate, (the path is signposted) cross the next lovely beach ( and walk up onto the grassy headland. It is worth taking a detour to the right, to the edge of the grassy area to enjoy the fabulous view of Aberffraw beach. If it’s windy there is a cleverly designed stone bench providing shelter.

11

There are lovely views here down the river to the historic village of Aberffraw (photo River). I recommend back-tracking to rejoin the path you left. This way you pass the remaining rocks of a bronze age burial cairn.

12

When the path splits, take the grassy path to your left marked with a post and yellow arrow.

13

Walk through the metal gate and carry straight on up the track.

Birdwatchers take note
14

Follow this track until you join the narrow road. Turn left here to return to your car. The views are lovely across a patchwork of green fields and down into Porth Cwyfan.

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Caroline Bateson
Author

This is an easy walk with a backdrop of fabulous mountain scenery. There are big beaches, tiny coves and an indented rocky coast. You have an excellent chance of seal watching and plenty of other wildlife too.

Route summaryBeginning with the chance to explore the enticing church island at Porth Cwyfan, you then walk around the beautiful headland towards Aberffraw. The coastline is indented with small coves and big rocks. The sea is mirror clear with great visibility for sea watching. The rare chough can be seen and heard, there are also wading birds, butterflies and many wildflowers along the route.

1.  Start of your journey: Descend the rough slipway onto the beach. If the tide is low, you can make a detour to explore the fantastic little church on its enticing island by crossing the beach and walking along the stone causeway.

2.  To continue around the headland, walk to the left of the beach, it is very rocky! The path is also being eroded, but you can see it along the fence-line.

3.  Follow the grassy footpath around the headland, you are on the Anglesey Coastal Footpath. Hopefully, the weather will be clear and you can enjoy lovely views across to the mountains of Snowdonia and the Llyn Peninsula.

4.  Next to a long, narrow gully in the cliffs is an old winch. Once a rich area for fishing, this winch was used to bring up the catches. Just beyond this is a beautiful cove with clear blue-green water, really gorgeous.

5.  You will shortly arrive at the point of the headland, with extensive rocks stretching out into the sea (Braich-lwyd). Turning left at this point, the footpath becomes enclosed by wind-pruned blackthorn hedges. You will be getting your first glimpse of the clean expanse of the buttery yellow sand of Aberffraw beach. Away to your right, you might be able to make out distant Llanddwyn island (with its small white beacons), backed by the Nantlle ridge.

6.  Follow the Anglesey Coastal Footpath signs along this exhilarating stretch of coast. Each time you round a corner, the Aberffraw beach is a bit closer and more mountain views (of Snowdon and the Carneddau) are becoming visible. At high tide, the next bit can be a bit tricky and can involve some clambering over rocks. Follow the waymarker onto and across the beach, at midpoint you can see where the original path has collapsed along with an old corrugated iron shed. If it’s low tide you can walk along the beach if the water is up and you don’t want to paddle there is a short few minute clamber over these rocks.

7.  At high tide, the next bit can be a bit tricky and can involve some clambering over rocks. Follow the waymarker onto and across the beach, at mid point, you can see where the original path has collapsed along with an old corrugated iron shed. If it’s low tide you can walk along the beach if the water is up and you don’t want to paddle there is a short few minute clamber over these rocks.

8.  There are lovely views here down the river to the historic village of Aberffraw. I recommend back-tracking to rejoin the path you left. This way you pass the remaining rocks of a bronze age burial cairn.

9.  When the path splits, take the grassy path to your left marked with a post and yellow arrow. Walk through the metal gate and carry straight on up the track.

10. End of your journey: Follow this track until you join the narrow road. Turn left here to return to your car. The views are lovely across a patchwork of green fields and down into Porth Cwyfan.

ABERFFRAW Anglesey

Below you'll find all the information you'll need to help you along with this walk; where to park, whether or not there are loos and if it is dog friendly.

Parking & access
  • Parking is free and at the start of the walk. There is limited roadside parking. This beach can be used by windsurfers and can get busy when the surf is good. Please do not park where you will block gateways or near the ‘No Parking’ sign.

  • Access is mostly level - some steps or lips, uneven tussocky grassland. There are some rocky bits, a short rock clamber is necessary at high tide.

Bus stop
Loos
  • None

Dogs

Suitable for dogs, but please keep on a lead on the beaches between April - August to protect ground nesting birds.

Places to eat
  • Y Goron/The Crown Aberffraw
Itinerary

Disclaimer

You are responsible for your own safety when walking a suggested route. Only walk if you are medically able to. We make no representations or warranties as to the accuracy of the information on this site in relation to any of the suggested routes. While we try to ensure that all walking routes on this site are suitable and safe for walking by people of a reasonable level of experience and fitness, you should be aware that walking, like all outdoor activities, carries a degree of risk to person and property.

We accept no responsibility for loss or damage to personal effects, personal accident, injury or public liability in relation to a suggested route on this site (although we do not exclude or limit in any way our liability to you where it would be unlawful to do so). Furthermore, while we try to ensure that all suggested routes follow public rights of way, these are liable to change and you should ensure that all routes are rights of way at the time of walking. Please respect private property (including livestock), as we accept no responsibility for trespassing or damage to private property, to either you or any third party. Mountains and farmland are likely to be private property, please respect the landowners and their property. Please take extra care around traffic, farm machinery and livestock, and around steep drops on mountain or cliff paths.

Please walk within your group’s level of health, fitness and experience and follow advice from relevant authorities. Check the weather forecast (and, where relevant, tide timetables) in advance of a walk. Do not walk in adverse weather and always pack food, water, bright high-visibility warm and waterproof clothing, and a recent OS map, compass, torch and mobile phone. Proper footwear should be worn. Please let people know what time you are due to arrive at your destination. Children and pets should be supervised at all times, and dogs should be kept on a lead, particularly around farmland and livestock.

The contents of this site is provided for general information only. It is not intended to amount to advice on which you should rely. Where this site contains links to other sites and resources provided by third parties, these links are provided for your information only. Such links should not be interpreted as approval by us of those linked websites or information you may obtain from them. We have no control over the contents of those sites or resources.

If you do find any errors within any of our suggested routes, we would be grateful if you would let us know by emailing us at explore@menaiholidays.co.uk

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