Island in the Straits Buggy Walk/Wheelchair WalkMenai Bridge, Anglesey

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If you are walking with a pushchair or wheelchair, walk across to the left-hand corner of the Coed Cyrnol car park and there is access to the side of the gate. Follow the path down the hill.

Tree notes
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Once you are out of the woods, walk straight across the stone causeway directly in front of you and take the small walled path round the right side of the island.

Natural features
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From the far side of the island, there is a distant view of the newer Brittania Bridge which carries the A55 and rail link. As you round the island, you will find the old, tiny church of St. Tysilio, dating from 630 AD, unfortunately, it is often locked. It’s a very simple building with no electricity.

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You can follow the path on through the churchyard to complete the small island circuit or divert left to climb up to the war memorial at the highest point.

You can’t really get a pushchair up here, but it is only a short toddle! Views are great up and down the beautifully wooded sides of the Menai Strait, you also get a glimpse of Thomas Telford’s elegant bridge from here.

A point for parents
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Just before you leave the island, notice the massive tree and slate grave to commemorate three men killed in the construction of Thomas Telford’s bridge. Health and safety must have been so lax back then! So many great works of construction carried an inevitable loss of life.Recross the stone causeway and turn right along the promenade.

Look out for
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This walkway is usually sheltered from the wind and there are a selection of nice benches to sun yourself on. In September there are blackberries to pick and it’s also a good area for butterflies. A little further on and you will come to some information boards which explain how Belgian prisoners of war built this promenade as a gesture of thanks to the community of Menai Bridge, which took in and housed these refugees.

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Rounding the corner the view of Telford’s bridge is becoming increasingly spectacular. There is a gravelly beach over the wall (another nice place for kids to stop and play) and more well positioned benches.

Point of Interest
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From here, take the path which rises steeply uphill and eventually joins a quiet road. Keep right next to the wall. The coastal path is signposted to the right, you can take a peek at the small stone circle, but the small loop is not suitable for pushchairs/wheelchairs.

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Soon you will arrive at the best viewpoint for Telford’s bridge - you are almost underneath it now. There is also a beautifully carved rock down to your right.

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It is really very cool walking beneath this beautiful bridge, which is built from Anglesey rock - Carboniferous Limestone, quarried from Penmon (opposite Puffin Island) (John Conway). As you emerge from under the bridge, there is a grassy picnic area on your right with close-up views of the bridge and both directions up and down the straits. Take care if you stand on the edge of the picnic area - there is a sheer drop into the water! To the far left, you can see the elegant pier in Bangor and the distant yachts moored off Beaumaris.

Historic note
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Return to the road and turn right. The rest of the walk is along the pretty streets of Menai Bridge, with a great variety of interesting house and gardens.There are some lovely waterside houses on your left. The public footpath points up some steps so if you are walking with a buggy or wheelchair carry on and you can shortly loop up to the left on the road (it’s not busy).

Something to spot
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Take the road that swings sharply to your left, past the post box and you will start walking up a fairly steep hill. The is Cambria Road and you will be facing the bridge once again. Follow the blue footpath arrows and look for the lovely cormorant sculpture in the garden on the right.

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Turn left at the next junction and walk up through the ‘No Entry’ signs. Walk up the One Way street. The Bridge Tavern will be on your right.

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Turn right and walk in front of the pub onto Telford Road. Cross the road using the traffic island. Walk towards the stone wall and you will pass Waitrose on your left. There is another traffic island here you can use to cross over and return to the car park. Alternatively, you could visit Menai Heritage in the Thomas Telford Centre just a few minutes walk on the right-hand side of this road (Mona Road) and on your right. Inside you will find historic displays, information and more.

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Caroline Bateson
Author

A lovely, easy access walk ideal for families to experience the beauty and history of Ynys Tysilio (Church Island) in the Menai Strait.

Route summary: On this walk you can enjoy great views of the two bridges spanning the Menai Strait, discover wildlife and local history. Descending through beautiful woodland, you emerge onto the edge of the unique Menai Strait. There are lots of woodland and coastal birds to spot and the tiny but interesting Ynys Tysilio to discover.

You can climb to the highest point for an elevated view, explore the church of St.Tysilio and walk underneath the historic suspension bridge built by Thomas Telford. There are lots of sheltered, sunny benches to sit on from where you can enjoy the views. And there are plenty of places suitable for children to play.

1.  Start of your journey.  If you are walking with a pushchair or wheelchair, walk across to the left-hand corner of the Coed Cyrnol car park and there is access around the side of the gate. Follow the path down the hill.

2.  Once you are out of the woods, walk straight across the stone causeway directly in front of you and take the small walled path around the right side of the island

3.  From the far side of the island, there is a distant view of the newer Brittania Bridge which carries the A55 and rail link. As you round the island, you will find the old, tiny church of St. Tysilio, dating from 630 AD, unfortunately, it is often locked. It’s a very simple building with no electricity.

4.  You can follow the path on through the churchyard to complete the small island circuit or divert left to climb up to the war memorial at the highest point. You can’t really get a pushchair up here, but it is only a short toddle! Views are great up and down the beautifully wooded sides of the Menai Strait, you also get a glimpse of Thomas Telford’s elegant bridge from here.

5.  Just before you leave the island, notice the massive tree and slate grave to commemorate three men killed in the construction of Thomas Telford’s bridge. Health and safety must have been so lax back then! So many great works of construction carried an inevitable loss of life.

6.  This walkway is usually sheltered from the wind and there is a selection of nice benches to sun yourself on. In September there are blackberries to pick and it’s also a good area for butterflies. A little further on and you will come to some information boards which explain how Belgian prisoners of war built this promenade as a gesture of thanks to the community of Menai Bridge, which took in and housed these refugees.

7.  Rounding the corner the view of Telford’s suspension bridge is becoming increasingly spectacular. There is a gravelly beach over the wall (another nice place for kids to stop and play) and more well-positioned benches.

8.  From here, take the path which rises steeply uphill and eventually joins a quiet road. Keep right next to the wall. The coastal path is signposted to the right,  you can take a peek at the small stone circle,  but the small loop is not suitable for pushchairs/wheelchairs.

9.  Soon you will arrive at the best viewpoint for Telford’s bridge - you are almost underneath it now. There is also a beautifully carved rock down to your right.

10.  End of your journey: Turn right and walk in front of the pub onto Telford Road. Cross the road using the traffic island. Walk towards the stone wall and you will pass Waitrose on your left. There is another traffic island here you can use to cross over and return to the car park.

Below you'll find all the information you'll need to help you along with this walk; where to park, whether or not there are loos and if it is dog friendly.

Parking & access
  • Coed Cyrnol Car Park is signposted from the road. Walk begins from here.
  • Nearby is 2 hours free parking at Waitrose car park
Bus stop
Loos
  • Loos are located in Waitrose near the start/finish.
Dogs
  • You can bring dogs as long as you clean up after them. Most of the walk is on surfaced paths with limited open space. The last part of the walk is alongside a busy road - they would need to be kept on a lead at this point.
Places to eat
Itinerary

Disclaimer

You are responsible for your own safety when walking a suggested route. Only walk if you are medically able to. We make no representations or warranties as to the accuracy of the information on this site in relation to any of the suggested routes. While we try to ensure that all walking routes on this site are suitable and safe for walking by people of a reasonable level of experience and fitness, you should be aware that walking, like all outdoor activities, carries a degree of risk to person and property.

We accept no responsibility for loss or damage to personal effects, personal accident, injury or public liability in relation to a suggested route on this site (although we do not exclude or limit in any way our liability to you where it would be unlawful to do so). Furthermore, while we try to ensure that all suggested routes follow public rights of way, these are liable to change and you should ensure that all routes are rights of way at the time of walking. Please respect private property (including livestock), as we accept no responsibility for trespassing or damage to private property, to either you or any third party. Mountains and farmland are likely to be private property, please respect the landowners and their property. Please take extra care around traffic, farm machinery and livestock, and around steep drops on mountain or cliff paths.

Please walk within your group’s level of health, fitness and experience and follow advice from relevant authorities. Check the weather forecast (and, where relevant, tide timetables) in advance of a walk. Do not walk in adverse weather and always pack food, water, bright high-visibility warm and waterproof clothing, and a recent OS map, compass, torch and mobile phone. Proper footwear should be worn. Please let people know what time you are due to arrive at your destination. Children and pets should be supervised at all times, and dogs should be kept on a lead, particularly around farmland and livestock.

The contents of this site is provided for general information only. It is not intended to amount to advice on which you should rely. Where this site contains links to other sites and resources provided by third parties, these links are provided for your information only. Such links should not be interpreted as approval by us of those linked websites or information you may obtain from them. We have no control over the contents of those sites or resources.

If you do find any errors within any of our suggested routes, we would be grateful if you would let us know by emailing us at explore@menaiholidays.co.uk

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