Trearddur Bay to Porth Dafarch Circular Coastal and Clifftop walkTrearddur Bay, Anglesey

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From Trearddur’s RNLI Station, head north, following the road (Lon Isallt) -  heading out of the village towards the large and impressive looking house (Craig-y-Mor) on the far right/west of the bay - which overlooks a pebbly little beach known as Porth-y-Afon. 

Interesting fact
2

From here, follow the footpath sign up the gently sloping lane, to the right of Porth Y Afon and Craig-y-mor. Pass the house, heading around the coast, past the old winch behind the bay here, and up towards the white house at the top - where you’ll see another footpath sign. Pass this house, and a second one (called, appropriately, ‘The Headland’), both on your right, and continue down the slope following the path/lane. NB There’s a super headland promontory you can reach from here - just follow one of the auxiliary footpaths to the left. It’s off the direct route, but fun to explore - and the views are fabulous!

Walkers' note
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Once you’ve explored the promontory, get back onto the main path and follow it’s undulating, grassy contours, as it heads towards the next bay, Porth-y- Pwll - which is split in two by a large rock formation; again, this is a great place for a spot of exploring! Super for rockpooling and paddling during the summer months - with boulders to clamber over and coves to investigate!

Walkers' tip
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From Porth-y-Pwll - either by crossing the beach - or via the road, make your way onto the headland to your right; You’ll find the access point near to the bollard and footpath sign on the far right of the bay, just beyond the sea-wall. Keep following the path as it heads up and onto the headland - with fencing and fields to your right. so take care!

Geological note
5

For more great views, make a quick detour onto the grassy promontory here - to the left - which involves taking the little path down, then up and onto it; it’s slightly worn in places, so take care! Afterwards, make your way back onto the path-proper, and continue onwards. For a while, you turn inland, with the sea behind you, but soon become more-or-less parallel to the coastline again.

Walkers' tips
6

Continue along the path as it brings you to the mouth of Porth-y-Post, then around the side of bay, heading inland for a while - past a viewing bench and onto the beach. There are a couple of paths to follow as you head into the bay but, as they run parallel, you can choose either. To get onto the beach there are various steep-ish routes off the path as you come into the bay - but for an easier access point - follow the main path all the way around to back of the beach.The field-fencing should still be to your right. Porth y Post is hard to miss because of the large rock sticking out in its bay.

Take care
7

Now, the next section involves crossing an eroded part of the coastal path, above Porth-y-Corwgl, with a long drop - so, if you’d rather not risk it, take the directions 7a or the ones 7b if you do!

Did you know?
8

Come off the coastal path onto the road at Porth y Post, then head left, all the way around the back of headland here, ignoring the footpath sign on the right, up the hill and past the house called ‘Moryn’ on the left. Shortly, you’ll see a low stone, square-ish bollard at the end of a low stone-wall on the left - and its through the gap to the right of this where you can step back onto the coastal path again, having missed out the eroded section, Next,  go to direction No 9. Alternatively, keep following the road until you see come to the next footpath sign, a few minutes further on, pointing left, and continue on from (***)  

Take care
9
  • However, if you don’t mind an element of risk, make your way across to the opposite headland off Porth Y Post- either by crossing the beach or behind the low sea-wall. There are stone steps up from the bay, and smaller ones just after the wall to the left. Next, follow the path as it runs parallel to this side of the bay - out towards the mouth again. You’ll soon start to swing right, heading towards the next bay, Porth-y-Corgwyl. Continue downwards, crossing the track that runs down to the bay, then head up, and onto the headland again. You’ll pass a couple of viewing benches (just below a house called ‘Moryn’) - one of which is right next to the footpath. As you begin to gain height, to the far right behind the wall, you’ll begin to see and hear the road again. Head towards the wall, specifically towards the ‘spur’ that juts out - and keep going. However, as the path has eroded at the end of the spur, you’ll need to take great care crossing here! Alternatively, hop over the wall to your right, out onto the road. After a few steps, where the wall ends with a squarish, low, bollard, you can hop back onto the coastal path!
Walkers' tips
10

Once you’ve successfully negotiated Porth-y-Corwgl (either over or behind it), and you’ve passed the eroded section, follow the path as it heads towards the sea, then curves right, towards a white cottage on the edge of the cliffs. The path takes you past the cottage’s gate post (with lions on the top), then up and over a grass-covered stone wall/stile. From here follow the path that runs more or less parallel with the stone wall to your right, until you step down onto a track. (***)From here head left, down towards the sea, passing a property (currently under construction) on the left - until you see a kissing gate leading out onto the headland

Walkers' note
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Pass through the wishing gate (just to the right of the house/construction site) - then over a little wooden bridge. From here head back onto the headland proper, and begin to bear right - following the coastline all the way around to Porth Dafarch. Again, there are a variety of paths to chose from, however, if you walk as close to the edge as you dare, you’ll see the most amazing rock formations - including caves and stunning cliffs! The geology on this part of the route really is awe-inspiring - with some of the most rugged cliffs on the island! Even if this takes you off course for a while - the route around the cliff-edges is unmissable! As you get close to Porth Dafarch, a wishing gate leads you off the headland and down the side of the bay - where the path narrows. You can get down off the path to the beach here - but for an easier access point - keep going until it brings you round to the back of the bay.

Look around
12

After enjoying the delights of Porth Dafarch it’s time to head ‘home’. You can either retrace your steps across the headland, or make your way back by means of the road, which is just behind the sea-wall here. Just head right and keep going, following the windy, county road (Lon Isallt) all the way back to Trearddur. The road route is quite a lot quicker, but you’ll still get some wonderful views - as well as the chance to view (nosey at) fabulous seaside properties! Just head right.

Did you know?
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Sophie Glanville
Author

This awe-inspiring (circular) walk takes you away from the hustle and bustle of Trearddur - and up the impressive, rocky coastline of Holy Island’s western shores, as far as Porth Dafarch - incorporating numerous sheltered bays and coves along the way!

Route Summary: For imposing cliffs, hidden coves and pretty little beaches, this rugged 2-mile coastal walk is the one for you! The undulating route traverses grassy, wild-flower covered headlands, cliffside paths and pebble-strewn bays - with plenty of opportunity for exploration and adventure!

1. Start of your journey: From Trearddur’s RNLI Station, head north, following the road (Lon Isallt), heading out of the village towards the large and impressive looking house (Craig-y-Mor) on the far right/west of the bay, which overlooks a pebbly little beach known as Porth-y-Afon.

2.  From here, follow the footpath sign up the gently sloping lane, to the right of Porth Y Afon and Craig-y-Mor. Pass the house, heading around the coast, past the old winch behind the bay here, and up towards the white house at the top - where you’ll see another footpath sign. Pass this house, and a second one (called, appropriately, ‘The Headland’), both on your right, and continue down the slope following the path/lane. NB There’s a super headland promontory you can reach from here - just follow one of the auxiliary footpaths to the left. It’s off the direct route, but fun to explore - and the views are fabulous!

3.  Once you’ve explored the promontory, get back onto the main path and follow its' undulating, grassy contours, as it heads towards the next bay, Porth-y- Pwll - which is split in two by a large rock formation; again, this is a great place for a spot of exploring! Super for rock pooling and paddling during the summer months, with boulders to clamber over and coves to investigate!

4.  From Porth-y-Pwll - either by crossing the beach - or via the road, make your way onto the headland to your right; You’ll find the access point near to the bollard and footpath sign on the far right of the bay, just beyond the sea-wall. Keep following the path as it heads up and onto the headland - with fencing and fields to your right.

5.  For more great views, make a quick detour onto the grassy promontory here - to the left - which involves taking the little path down, then up and onto it; it’s slightly worn in places, so take care! Afterwards, make your way back onto the path-proper, and continue onward. For a while, you turn inland, with the sea behind you, but soon become more-or-less parallel to the coastline again.

6.  Continue along the path as it brings you to the mouth of Porth-y-Post, then around the side of the bay, heading inland for a while - past a viewing bench and onto the beach. There are a couple of paths to follow as you head into the bay but, as they run parallel, you can choose either. To get onto the beach there are various steep-ish routes off the path as you come into the bay - but for an easier access point - follow the main path all the way around to back of the beach.The field-fencing should still be to your right. Porth y Pos is hard to miss because of the large rock sticking out in its bay.

Now, the next section involves crossing an eroded part of the coastal path, above Porth-y-Corwgl, with a long drop - so, if you’d rather not risk it, take the directions in blue (No.7), or the ones in orange (No. 8) if you do!

7.  Come off the coastal path onto the road at Porth y Post, then head left, all the way around the back of headland here, ignoring the footpath sign on the right, up the hill and past the house called ‘Moryn’ on the left. Shortly, you’ll see a low stone, square-ish bollard at the end of a low stone-wall on the left - and it is through the gap to the right of this where you can step back onto the coastal path again, having missed out the eroded section, Next, go to direction No 9. Alternatively, keep following the road until you see come to the next footpath sign, a few minutes further on, pointing left, and continue on from.

However, if you don’t mind a mild element of risk, make your way across to the opposite headland off Porth Y Post- either by crossing the beach or behind the low sea-wall. There are stone steps up from the bay, and smaller ones just after the wall to the left. Next, follow the path as it runs parallel to this side of the bay - out towards the mouth again. You’ll soon start to swing right, heading towards the next bay, Porth-y-Corgwyl. Continue downwards, crossing the track that runs down to the bay, then head up, and onto the headland again. You’ll pass a couple of viewing benches (just below a house called ‘Moryn’) - one of which is right next to the footpath.

As you begin to gain height, to the far right behind the wall, you’ll begin to see and hear the road again. Head towards the wall, specifically towards the ‘spur’ that juts out - and keep going. However, as the path has eroded at the end of the spur, you’ll need to take great care crossing here! Alternatively, hop over the wall to your right, out onto the road. After a few steps, where the wall ends with a squarish, low, bollard, you can hop back onto the coastal path!

8.  Once you’ve successfully negotiated Porth-y-Corwgl (either over or behind it), and you’ve passed the eroded section, follow the path as it heads towards the sea, then curves right, towards a white cottage on the edge of the cliffs. The path takes you past the cottage’s gate post (with lions on the top), then up and over a grass-covered stone wall/stile. From here follow the path that runs more or less parallel with the stone wall to your right, until you step down onto a track. (***)

From here head left, down towards the sea, passing a property (currently under construction) on the left - until you see a kissing gate leading out onto the headland.

9.  Pass through the wishing gate (just to the right of the house/construction site) - then over a little wooden bridge. From here head back onto the headland proper, and begin to bear right - following the coastline all the way around to Porth Dafarch. Again, there are a variety of paths to chose from, however, if you walk as close to the edge as you dare, you’ll see the most amazing rock formations - including caves and stunning cliffs! The geology on this part of the route really is awe-inspiring - with some of the most rugged cliffs on the island! Even if this takes you off course for a while - the route around the cliff-edges is unmissable! As you get close to Porth Dafarch, a wishing gate leads you off the headland and down the side of the bay - where the path narrows. You can get down off the path to the beach here - but for an easier access point - keep going until it brings you round to the back of the bay.

10.  End of your journey: After enjoying the delights of Porth Dafarch it’s time to head ‘home’. You can either retrace your steps across the headland or make your way back by means of the road, which is just behind the sea-wall here. Just head right and keep going, following the windy, county road (Lon Isallt) all the way back to Trearddur. The road route is quite a lot quicker, but you’ll still get some wonderful views - as well as the chance to view (nosey at) fabulous seaside properties! Just head right!

TREARDDUR BAY Anglesey

Below you'll find all the information you'll need to help you along with this walk; where to park, whether or not there are loos and if it is dog friendly.

Parking & access
  • Pay and Display  - Lon Isallt, Trearddur Bay - LL65 2UN (to left of The Black Seal - and close to the RNLI Station)

  • Pay and Display - Lon St. Ffraid, Trearddur Bay - LL65 2YR (to left of The Sea Shanty). There are public conveniences here too.

  • There are a few (free) spaces behind the beach, next to the RNLI Station - as well behind the road here (close to The Trearddur Bay Hotel) - and a few on the main road through Trearddur - although, some have time restrictions.

  • Watch out for uneven steps.

Loos
  • Public toilets are located in the main Trearddur Bay carpark (Lon St. Ffraid) behind the beach, open 15th March - 31st October. There’s a 20 pence charge. It has baby changing and disabled facilities, as well as drinking water.

  • There are also (free) public conveniences on Porth Dafarch, again only open during peak seasons.

Dogs
  • Dog friendly, but mind the steep cliffs and grazing livestock.
Places to eat
Itinerary

Disclaimer

You are responsible for your own safety when walking a suggested route. Only walk if you are medically able to. We make no representations or warranties as to the accuracy of the information on this site in relation to any of the suggested routes. While we try to ensure that all walking routes on this site are suitable and safe for walking by people of a reasonable level of experience and fitness, you should be aware that walking, like all outdoor activities, carries a degree of risk to person and property.

We accept no responsibility for loss or damage to personal effects, personal accident, injury or public liability in relation to a suggested route on this site (although we do not exclude or limit in any way our liability to you where it would be unlawful to do so). Furthermore, while we try to ensure that all suggested routes follow public rights of way, these are liable to change and you should ensure that all routes are rights of way at the time of walking. Please respect private property (including livestock), as we accept no responsibility for trespassing or damage to private property, to either you or any third party. Mountains and farmland are likely to be private property, please respect the landowners and their property. Please take extra care around traffic, farm machinery and livestock, and around steep drops on mountain or cliff paths.

Please walk within your group’s level of health, fitness and experience and follow advice from relevant authorities. Check the weather forecast (and, where relevant, tide timetables) in advance of a walk. Do not walk in adverse weather and always pack food, water, bright high-visibility warm and waterproof clothing, and a recent OS map, compass, torch and mobile phone. Proper footwear should be worn. Please let people know what time you are due to arrive at your destination. Children and pets should be supervised at all times, and dogs should be kept on a lead, particularly around farmland and livestock.

The contents of this site is provided for general information only. It is not intended to amount to advice on which you should rely. Where this site contains links to other sites and resources provided by third parties, these links are provided for your information only. Such links should not be interpreted as approval by us of those linked websites or information you may obtain from them. We have no control over the contents of those sites or resources.

If you do find any errors within any of our suggested routes, we would be grateful if you would let us know by emailing us at explore@menaiholidays.co.uk

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