Inland Sea ExploreValley, Anglesey

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Turn right at the start of the old stone bridge (which gives Four Mile Bridge its name). You should see the pretty white cottages opposite you, on the other side of the water (Photo). Follow the ‘Anglesey Coastal Footpath’ sign pointing to the right. In front of you is a grassy area backed by the Inland Sea. This is most scenic at high water, at low tide there is a lot of mud and sand! The tides are fascinating; once the inland sea is full of water, it takes hours to drain out of the small gaps in the bridge here and on the Stanley Embankment. There has been a bridge here since 1530 (The Guide to Anglesey, Steele & Williams) 2006. Which used to be the only way of crossing from mainland Anglesey to Holy Island. It carried the route of the original A5 from Holyhead to London.

Great for Birdspotting
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The path is obvious, passing a lovely lemon yellow cottage. The first ‘feature’ to spot is a special, but typical rock of this part of Anglesey called New Harbour schist. Can you see the waving swirls through it, where it has been squeezed into these mini folds? (John Conway, 2010).You will soon be walking through a narrow passageway between gorse bushes, a great place to walk on a windy day, giving lots of shelter.

Great for Blackberry picking
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Soon you will come to a short stretch of boardwalk which is great fun for children to clatter across, and then a scenic bench overlooking the entire Inland sea towards Holyhead mountain. You can sit and enjoy the view, if you have children with you, they can play at the shallow waters’ edge.

Point of Interest
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Keep following the footpath and notice how the blackthorn hedge to your right grows neatly like a big wave - it is kept beautifully wind pruned like this by prevailing westerly winds. You may have noticed that most coastal trees on this extreme tip of Anglesey are bent and battered by strong winds throughout the year. You will now see areas of saltmarsh and if the tide is high you have to take the upper path over a small cliff, the views are great from up here.

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Soon you will come to a fork in the path and you follow the track to the left (heading in the direction of the white windmill on the opposite shore). Anglesey has many windmills dotted across it, some derelict, some renovated as houses and only one, the Llynnon Mill restored as a working mill. They were used to harness the plentiful winds across the island which was once the ‘breadbasket of Wales’ Mon Mam Cymru. The relatively gentle climate of Anglesey and its’ rich soils grew abundant crops of wheat in the past.

6

This path takes you right around Leurad Island. I think the whole area has a feel of Swallows and Amazons to it. It is very peaceful and the opposite shore of rocks, woods and bracken entices you to sail over and explore it. There are lots of rabbits bounding about, spot the many holes and passageways they have made in the thick gorse bushes and brambles. If you walk quietly you are sure to spot some

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The salt marsh on your left has channels in perfectly straight lines. I am researching why they are there. You get a real sense of discovery as you walk around the edge of this wild little area and there are tiny headlands and mini beaches to explore. Look and listen out for flocks of musical linnets, (I saw a flock of about 20 last time I did this walk).

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The next interesting feature is the remains of a hut circle probably dating from the Iron Age. Like the Ty Mawr hut circles at South Stack, these people certainly found sheltered places to make their settlements. The waters of the Inland Sea would have provided a rich source of food for the inhabitants.

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Walk right to the end of the little headland to enjoy views across the water, then continue on your circuit.

Fantastic for Flora and Fauna
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Soon you will have completed the circuit of the promontory - the Isle of Anglesey Coastal Path continues to the Stanley Embankment on your left, but you need to take a right here and retrace your steps back to Four Mile Bridge. It is no hardship going back the same way, as the view is different and you can enjoy the sight of the white cottages around the water.

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If you have children with you, why not cross the bridge and take the first right in front of the three white cottages (wooden footpath sign points the way). My two girls and I have named the beach at the bottom ‘Snail Beach’ because we noticed in our many hours spent playing here, that tiny brown snails stack up on the pebbles and small rocks out of the water, as if drying themselves in the sun. I have no idea why they do this, but it is an amazing sight!

If you want more things to do with children, try crabbing off Four Mile Bridge, large crabs can be enticed with bacon as bait, but make sure you treat any caught crabs gently and return them to the water.

 

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Caroline Bateson
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This is a fabulous walk for children with miniature beaches, boardwalks, muddy pools, small cliffs and an island to discover (Ynys Leurad). And plenty of special special features to look for as you go round.

Route summary: The route follows the shore part of the Inland Sea, the special tidal lagoon which separates Holy Island from mainland Anglesey. It starts from the pretty waterside cottages of Four Mile Bridge. It is a great for children but can be enjoyed by anyone.

1.  Start of your journey: Turn right at the start of the old stone bridge (which gives Four Mile Bridge its name). You should see the pretty white cottages opposite you, on the other side of the water. Follow the ‘Anglesey Coastal Footpath’ sign pointing to the right. In front of you is a grassy area backed by the Inland Sea. This is most scenic at high water, at low tide there is a lot of mud and sand! The tides are fascinating; once the inland sea is full of water, it takes hours to drain out of the small gaps in the bridge here and on the Stanley Embankment. There has been a bridge here since 1530 which used to be the only way of crossing from mainland Anglesey to Holy Island. It carried the route of the original A5 from Holyhead to London.

2.  The path is obvious, passing a lovely lemon yellow cottage. The first ‘feature’ to spot is a special, but typical rock of this part of Anglesey called New Harbour schist. Can you see the waving swirls through it, where it has been squeezed into these mini folds? You will soon be walking through a narrow passageway between gorse bushes, a great place to walk on a windy day, giving lots of shelter.

3.  Soon you will come to a short stretch of boardwalk which is great fun for children to clatter across and then a scenic bench overlooking the entire Inland sea towards Holyhead Mountain. You can sit and enjoy the view and if you have children with you, they can play at the shallow waters’ edge.

4.  Keep following the footpath and notice how the blackthorn hedge to your right grows neatly like a big wave - it is kept beautifully wind pruned like this by prevailing westerly winds. You may have noticed that most coastal trees on this extreme tip of Anglesey are bent and battered by strong winds throughout the year. You will now see areas of salt marsh and if the tide is high, you have to take the upper path over a small cliff. The views are great from up here.

5.  Soon you will come to a fork in the path and you follow the track to the left (heading in the direction of the white windmill on the opposite shore). Anglesey has many windmills dotted across it, some derelict, some renovated as houses and only one, the Llynnon Mill restored as a working mill. They were used to harness the plentiful winds across the island which was once the ‘breadbasket of Wales’ Mon Mam Cymru . The  relatively gentle climate of Anglesey and its’ rich soils grew abundant crops of wheat in the past.

6.  This path takes you right around Leurad Island. I think the whole area has a feel of Swallows and Amazons to it. It is very peaceful and the opposite shore of rocks, woods and bracken entices you to sail over and explore it. There are lots of rabbits bounding about, spot the many holes and passageways they have made in the thick gorse bushes and brambles. If you walk quietly you are sure to spot some.

7.  The next interesting feature is the remains of a hut circle probably dating from the Iron Age. Like the Ty Mawr hut circles at South Stack, these people certainly found sheltered places to make their settlements. The waters of the Inland Sea would have provided a rich source of food for the inhabitants.

8.  Walk right to the end of the little headland to enjoy views across the water, then continue on your circuit. There are lots of interesting coastal plants to spot. The whole area of the Inland Sea is designated at Site of Special Scientific interest for its plant and bird life. From July - September beautiful mauve sea lavender grows along the edge of the water. Sea pinks flower from May onwards. Sea beet, with its  dark green shiny leaves also grows along the shore. Best between April - November, these can be picked and steamed - very good for you! You can eat the small succulent leaves at the top of the plant raw, the larger ones at the base need to be cooked. The large gorse bushes growing in the centre of the island flower on and off throughout the year, giving a brilliant yellow bloom and the evocative smell of coconut.

9.  Soon you will have completed the circuit of the promontory. The Isle of Anglesey Coastal Path continues to the Stanley Embankment on your left, but you need to take a right here and retrace your steps back to Four Mile Bridge. It is no hardship going back the same way, as the view is different and you can enjoy the sight of the white cottages around the water.

10. End of your journey: If you have children with you, why not cross the bridge and take the first right in front of the three white cottages (wooden footpath sign points the way)? My two girls and I have named the beach at the bottom ‘Snail Beach’ because we noticed in our many hours spent playing here, that tiny brown snails stack up on the pebbles and small rocks out of the water, as if drying themselves in the sun. I have no idea why they do this, but it is an amazing sight!.

If you want more things to do with children, try crabbing off Four Mile Bridge: large crabs can be enticed with bacon as bait, but do make sure you treat any  crabs caught gently and return them to the water.

Finally, there is a great cafe in Four Mile Bridge. You can reach it by walking up the road, up the small hill for a few minutes and it is on your right hand side. ‘Y Gegin Fach’ is a small cafe with BIG cake! It’s a proper traditional Anglesey cafe, open all year round.

FOUR MILE BRIDGE Anglesey

Below you'll find all the information you'll need to help you along with this walk; where to park, whether or not there are loos and if it is dog friendly.

Parking & access
  • Free roadside parking, spaces near Anderson Gallery.
  • Be wary of road traffic when leaving your car.
Bus stop
  • The bus stops in Four Mile Bridge are located on the village green and opposite the village green. The service is provided by Goodsir, No.23. Frequency is approximately hourly.
Loos
  • No public toilets.
Dogs
  • Due to the designation of the area as an SSSI and the presence of ground nesting birds, dogs must be kept on a lead during the breeding season (March - August).
Places to eat
  • Y Gegin Fach in Four Mile Bridge

Itinerary

Disclaimer

You are responsible for your own safety when walking a suggested route. Only walk if you are medically able to. We make no representations or warranties as to the accuracy of the information on this site in relation to any of the suggested routes. While we try to ensure that all walking routes on this site are suitable and safe for walking by people of a reasonable level of experience and fitness, you should be aware that walking, like all outdoor activities, carries a degree of risk to person and property.

We accept no responsibility for loss or damage to personal effects, personal accident, injury or public liability in relation to a suggested route on this site (although we do not exclude or limit in any way our liability to you where it would be unlawful to do so). Furthermore, while we try to ensure that all suggested routes follow public rights of way, these are liable to change and you should ensure that all routes are rights of way at the time of walking. Please respect private property (including livestock), as we accept no responsibility for trespassing or damage to private property, to either you or any third party. Mountains and farmland are likely to be private property, please respect the landowners and their property. Please take extra care around traffic, farm machinery and livestock, and around steep drops on mountain or cliff paths.

Please walk within your group’s level of health, fitness and experience and follow advice from relevant authorities. Check the weather forecast (and, where relevant, tide timetables) in advance of a walk. Do not walk in adverse weather and always pack food, water, bright high-visibility warm and waterproof clothing, and a recent OS map, compass, torch and mobile phone. Proper footwear should be worn. Please let people know what time you are due to arrive at your destination. Children and pets should be supervised at all times, and dogs should be kept on a lead, particularly around farmland and livestock.

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If you do find any errors within any of our suggested routes, we would be grateful if you would let us know by emailing us at explore@menaiholidays.co.uk

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