Conwy MountainConwy, Snowdonia

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1

From the car park take the obvious track that heads towards the hills and the sea. There will be a steep hillside sloping down to your left and small cliffs on your right

2

After about 200m the track bears right where it meets a stone wall. On your left, there is a path that heads up the hillside to the summit of Allt Wen. This short climb is well worth the effort for the views.

Quarrying point
3

Follow the white stone path, through the heather to the top and enjoy the expansive views to sea and hills.

Tongue twisters
4

From the summit head down along the broad heathery ridge, towards Conwy town and the windfarm out to sea, using one of the narrow paths that cut through the heather.

5

You will soon see a track at the base of the hill. Aim for the footpath sign next to the muddy stream with stepping stones and on the other side a black metal gate. Our route goes through the gate.

You may see..
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Through the gate follow the wide stony path until you see a path branching off to the left. Follow this and you will shortly reach a grassy crossroads. Continue to follow the narrow stony path straight ahead.

Something to spot
7

The path soon reaches a junction and in front of you the hillside swoops down to the A55 and the sea. Head right here, you will see a small bench next to a lone tree. A good spot to stop.

Historic note
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You are looking for a clear path, actually, the remains of the railway that would have taken away the slates. This takes you back along the Cwm.

You can see..
9

At a waymarker post take the left-hand path. Follow it uphill, it gets steep for a short section and either the left (steepest) or right-hand paths can be taken. 

You will soon reach a fine rocky summit with incredible views across to Llandudno and out to sea

The true summit and site of the Iron Age fort are over to the right. Head here next. A large boulder has information about the fort and a map of it’s outline.

Point of Interest
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From the fort continue down  along the crest of the ridge towards Conwy

11

The undulating ridge leads into woodland, continue to follow the path as it bears slightly right. There is a short steeper section where it leads you down to a road.

To head into Conwy town (less than half a mile) from here turn left along the road (Mountain Road). Follow Mountain Road downhill until the junction with Cadnant Park, then turn left and follow this to a bridge over the railway line. Cross the bridge to join the main road into town, turn right and one of the arches in the city walls is in front of you.

If you decide not to walk into town turn right here. And pick up at paragraph 13.

12

To rejoin the route from Conwy it is easiest to relocate at the Albion Pub then follow Bangor Road through the arch in the castle wall. Continue along Bangor Road until you reach the bridge over the railway on your left. Cross the bridge and continue to Mountain Road. Follow Mountain Road until its end.

13

At the end of Mountain Road, a footpath leads off to the right taking you uphill through woods. There is a stile and country park sign at its start.

14

The path takes you up the hill to a little cliff - ‘ Conwy Slab’. The path cuts below the cliff.

15

Keep following the path, with very little ascent. It will soon open up onto the hillside and you will pass a large split boulder on your left and shortly after a bench on your right.

Keep on the path until it drops down to join a track by a wall.

16

Turn right at the wall and follow the track, bearing left at a crossroads, until it takes you back down to the black gate you passed through earlier. Go through the gate, cross the stream and follow the track left back to the carpark.

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Rusty Bale
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A 4-mile circular walk on the very Northern edge of the Snowdonia National Park, taking in the ridge of ‘Conwy Mountain’. Incredible sea views across Conwy Bay to Anglesey and Llandudno and to the south, views to the remote Carneddau mountains.

Route summary: The route uses easy to follow but occasionally rough stone and grass paths and includes parts of the Wales Coast Path. The route described starts at the top of the Sychnant Pass and gives the option of visiting the walled town of Conwy at its halfway point. This is a route that could easily be started in Conwy too.

This is a very straightforward walk and despite its' seemingly lofty elevation, has very little ascent. Besides the fantastic views, there are plenty of other things to see along the way: remains of an Iron Age fort, old quarry workings and do keep an eye out for wild Carneddau ponies.

Conwy Mountain also benefits from surprisingly sunny and drier weather than other areas of the park. When the more central, larger hills are in the clouds and it’s raining, this area is often drier. Llandudno webcam is a good way to check - if it’s dry there it should be dry in Conwy! And the town of Conwy is well served with shops, cafes, pubs, restaurants, quayside and of course the Castle. Well worth a visit.


1.  Start of your journey.  From the car park, take the obvious track that heads towards the hills and the sea. There will be a steep hillside sloping down to your left and small cliffs on your right.

2.  After about 200m the track bears right where it meets a stone wall. On your left there is a path that heads up the hill side to the summit of Allt Wen (Allt Wen is Welsh for White Hill.). This short climb is well worth the effort for the views.

3.  Follow the white stone path, through the heather to the top and enjoy the expansive views to sea and hills.  The sprawling villages below are Dwygyfylchi and Penmaenmawr. Try pronouncing Dwygyfylchi - Duuee - ge - vol - Khee!

4.  From the summit head down along the broad heathery ridge, towards Conwy town and the wind farm out to sea, using one of the narrow paths that cut through the heather.

5.  You will soon see a track at the base of the hill. Aim for the footpath sign next to the muddy stream with stepping stones and on the other side a black metal gate. Our route goes through the gate.

6.  Through the gate follow the wide stony path until you see a path branching off to the left. Follow this and you will shortly reach a grassy crossroads. Continue to follow the narrow stony path straight ahead. Keep an eye out for wild Carneddau ponies here.

7.  The path soon reaches a junction and in front of you the hill side swoops down to the A55 and the sea. Head right here, you will see a small bench next to a lone tree. A good spot to stop. The buildings below are what is left of the old quarry workings. Millstone was quarried here during the Napoleonic wars.

8.  From the small bench take the path that continues up towards the summit of Conwy Mountain.

9.  At a way marker post take the left hand path. Follow it up hill, it gets steep for a short section and either the left (steepest) or right hand paths can be taken. You will soon reach a fine rocky summit with incredible views across to Llandudno and out to sea. The true summit and site of the Iron Age fort is over to the right. Head here next. A large boulder has information about the fort and a map of its' outline. The fort, Castell Caer Seion, dates back to the 6th century BC and is a scheduled ancient monument.

10.  From the fort continue down along the crest of the ridge towards Conwy.

11.  The undulating ridge leads into woodland, continue to follow the path as it bears slightly right. There is a short steeper section where it leads you down to a road. To head into Conwy town (less than half a mile) from here turn right along the road (Mountain Road). Follow Mountain Road down hill until the junction with Cadnant Park, then turn left and follow this to a bridge over the railway line. Cross the bridge to join the main road into town, turn right and one of the arches in the city walls is in front of you.

If you decide not to walk into town turn right here. And pick up at paragraph 13.

Conwy is well worth a visit. A walk along the top of the castle walls is free and gives great views out across the Conwy river and town. The castle itself is also open - admission fee applies. There are lots of very good pubs, cafes and excellent fish and chips. It is also possible to start the walk from here. If you do, follow the instructions from paragraph 12.

12.  To rejoin the route from Conwy it is easiest to relocate at the Albion Pub then follow Bangor Road through the arch in the castle wall. Continue along Bangor Road until you reach the bridge over the railway on your left. Cross the bridge and continue to Mountain Road. Follow Mountain Road until its end.

13.  At the end of Mountain Road a footpath leads off to the right taking you up hill through woods. There is a stile and country park sign at its' start.

14.  The path takes you up the hill to a little cliff - ‘ Conwy Slab’. The path cuts below the cliff.

15.  Keep following the path, with very little ascent. It will soon open up onto the hillside and you will pass a large split boulder on your left and shortly after a bench on your right. Keep on the path until it drops down to join a track by a wall

16. End of your journey: Turn right at the wall and follow the track, bearing left at a crossroads, until it takes you back down to the black gate you passed through earlier. Go through the gate, cross the stream and follow the track left back to the car park.

CONWY Snowdonia

Below you'll find all the information you'll need to help you along with this walk; where to park, whether or not there are loos and if it is dog-friendly.

Parking & access
  • Free car park at LL32 8BJ near to the Pensychnant Conservation Centre
  • Access is along very uneven ground
  • There is also a small amount of free parking at the top of the Sychnant Pass - it gets filled up quickly.
Loos
  • Various locations in Conwy including the Tourist Information Centre on Vicarage Road and Morfa Bach Car Park on Llanrwst Road
Places to eat
  • There are plenty of good places to eat and drink in Conwy, including: the Erskine Arms, Amelies Cafe and L's bookshop.
Dogs
  • Route passes through livestock grazing so you are advised to keep dogs on a lead.
Itinerary

Disclaimer

You are responsible for your own safety when walking a suggested route. Only walk if you are medically able to. We make no representations or warranties as to the accuracy of the information on this site in relation to any of the suggested routes. While we try to ensure that all walking routes on this site are suitable and safe for walking by people of a reasonable level of experience and fitness, you should be aware that walking, like all outdoor activities, carries a degree of risk to person and property.

We accept no responsibility for loss or damage to personal effects, personal accident, injury or public liability in relation to a suggested route on this site (although we do not exclude or limit in any way our liability to you where it would be unlawful to do so). Furthermore, while we try to ensure that all suggested routes follow public rights of way, these are liable to change and you should ensure that all routes are rights of way at the time of walking. Please respect private property (including livestock), as we accept no responsibility for trespassing or damage to private property, to either you or any third party. Mountains and farmland are likely to be private property, please respect the landowners and their property. Please take extra care around traffic, farm machinery and livestock, and around steep drops on mountain or cliff paths.

Please walk within your group’s level of health, fitness and experience and follow advice from relevant authorities. Check the weather forecast (and, where relevant, tide timetables) in advance of a walk. Do not walk in adverse weather and always pack food, water, bright high-visibility warm and waterproof clothing, and a recent OS map, compass, torch and mobile phone. Proper footwear should be worn. Please let people know what time you are due to arrive at your destination. Children and pets should be supervised at all times, and dogs should be kept on a lead, particularly around farmland and livestock.

The contents of this site is provided for general information only. It is not intended to amount to advice on which you should rely. Where this site contains links to other sites and resources provided by third parties, these links are provided for your information only. Such links should not be interpreted as approval by us of those linked websites or information you may obtain from them. We have no control over the contents of those sites or resources.

If you do find any errors within any of our suggested routes, we would be grateful if you would let us know by emailing us at explore@menaiholidays.co.uk

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