Moelfre - Lligwy - MoelfreMoelfre, Anglesey

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1

From the Pay and Display car park by Moelfre’s picturesque Harbour, head down the steps, around the back of the bay, then up the slope, along the side of the road, turning right where the road curves left, down the (signposted) footpath that runs by the side of the property called ‘Penrallt’. Keep following this path towards, and then behind, the old lifeboat house on Porth Neigwl, all the way to the new RNLI Station, passing viewing benches, and the Seawatch Centre on the left just beforehand. ‘Moelfre’, translates as 'bald or barren hill', which describes the land behind Moelfre village, as seen from the sea. Moelfre Bay is a popular, seaside spot - bustling with locals and tourists alike on sunny days

Points of interest
2

After passing the RNLI Station on the right, continue along the footpath, following the contours of the coast, past the quaint row of whitewashed fishermen’s cottages to the right; with views across the narrow channel, Y Swnt, to Ynys Moelfre/Moelfre Island. From here, step down onto ‘Porth yr Ynys/Island Bay’, walking across its shell and pebble-strewn beach, then head up onto the headland on the other side. The grassy headland here is crisscrossed with paths but, if in doubt, head towards the memorial seat on the edge, and following the path closest to the coast, with the sea on your right -  ignoring the paths leading inland.

Historic notes
3

You’re now heading towards Porth Helaeth/Wild Bay. Keep following the coastal path (with the sea always on your right) as it traverses the headland and cliffs in a W/NW direction. There are various waymarkers to guide you, and you’ll soon pass through a kissing gate. Follow the undulating cliffside path, where you’ll traverse grassy sections, pass pretty hedgerows, as well as more kissing gates. Porth Helaeth is a secluded, rugged, heavily pebbled bay, with a stream running down to the sea. The footpath runs along the back of the bay, but it’s easy to get down on to if you fancy a bit of exploration! Towards the back of the bay you’ll see a small caravan site.

Things to spot
4

After leaving Porth Helaeth behind, continue following the winding coastal footpath, always moving forward, in a W/NW direction. In some sections the path is edged by hedges, on others, there are little steps - as well as sheer drops off to the side - and In some places you’ll cross grassy fields.

For those with sharp eyes
5

Continue onwards, until you get to where the footpath turns SW, with a stone wall on the left, and kissing gate at the end. After passing through this you’ll find yourself heading north, past a property called ‘Moryn’, with a blue door in the wall here, and some impressive trees close by. Moryn sits to the side of another little bay, Porth Forllwyd with some outhouses/boathouses on the far side, as well as a small harbour wall. You’ll soon pass the second house, ‘Cae'r Borth’, situated at the back of the bay. From here, follow the path alongside it, with a high fence to your left - until you come out into an open field

Look out for
6

Cross the field, heading in a N/NW direction, following the path all the way to the kissing gate on the other side - where you’ll be able to see Ynys Dulas in the distance - it marks the termination of an old limestone headland which (geologically) separates Dulas Bay from Lligwy, and Red Wharf Bay, respectively.

Point of Interest
7

After passing through the kissing gate, follow the path as it heads SW, where you’ll get fabulous views of Porth Lligwy. There will be a fence on your left, but sheer drops and/or bushes to the right. There’s a simple viewing bench along this section. Lligwy is popular with watersport enthusiasts - especially windsurfers, surfers and kitesurfers - so, if it’s a windy day, you might be in for an arresting sight!

8

Soon enough you’ll come to a section of coastline with a wooden walkway and steps, which help you navigate down this section of the headland. Once you drop back onto the footpath, keep going, heading east along the side of the bay - heading east, towards the back of the beach. You’ll often find bushes to your left, and sheer drops to the right. The views continue to be awe-inspiring!

Geological note
9

Continue along the footpath as it begins to take you down and round to Lligwy Beach. There are a number of rough steps to go down, as well as up before you get there! At one point there’s a little set the takes you off the path onto the beach, however, if you keep going on the main path, you’ll get to the car park and cafe anyway. The River Lligwy runs out and across the sand on the northern side of the beach, and has a little wooden bridge crossing it.

Look out for
10

After a refreshing drink at the beach cafe, and/or a tasty snack - as well as enjoying the delights of the beach - it’s time to head back to Moelfre! You need to head out of the car park onto the road. Continue up the little slope, past the caravan site on the right, and up to the crossroads, where you’ll see a postbox on the left. Take the left-hand turning, and keep going, passing a small quarry site, until you come to the Moelfre village sign - and from here it’s easy to get back to the harbour by following this road into the village.

Other routes back
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Sophie Glanville
Author

Moelfre to Lligwy Circular Walk, Anglesey, North Wales


This winter warming walk traverses rugged cliffs, pebble-strewn coves, and a huge sandy bay!

Route summary:  Beginning from picturesque Moelfre, heading to lovely Lligwy, there’s a beach to suit everyone along the way. This journey guarantees bird life sightings, as well as islands and huge ships offshore. Plus the chance to spot dolphins, porpoise, and even whales!

Follow the coast as you head uphill and down dale, exploring the eastern side of Anglesey in all its geological glory.

1 Start of your journey: From the pay and display car park by Moelfre’s picturesque harbour, head down the steps, around the back of the bay. Then up the slope, along the side of the road, turning right where the road curves left, down the (signposted) footpath that runs by the side of the property called ‘Penrallt’. Keep following this path towards, and then behind, the old lifeboat house on Porth Neigwl, all the way to the new RNLI Station, passing viewing benches and the Seawatch Centre on the left just beforehand. ‘Moelfre’, translates as 'bald or barren hill', which describes the land behind Moelfre village, as seen from the sea. Moelfre Bay is a popular, seaside spot, bustling with locals and tourists alike on sunny days.

2.  After passing the RNLI Station on the right, continue along the footpath, following the contours of the coast, past the quaint row of whitewashed fishermen’s cottages to the right, with views across the narrow channel, Y Swnt, to Ynys Moelfre/Moelfre Island. From here, step down onto ‘Porth yr Ynys/Island Bay’, walking across its shell and pebble-strewn beach, then head up onto the headland on the other side. The grassy headland here is crisscrossed with paths but, if in doubt, head towards the memorial seat on the edge. And following the path closest to the coast, with the sea on your right, ignore the paths leading inland.

3.  You’re now heading towards Porth Helaeth/Wild Bay. Keep following the coastal path (with the sea always on your right) as it traverses the headland and cliffs in a W/NW direction. There are various waymarkers to guide you, and you’ll soon pass through a kissing gate. Follow the undulating cliffside path, where you’ll traverse grassy sections, pass pretty hedgerows, as well as more kissing gates. Porth Helaeth is a secluded, rugged, heavily pebbled bay, with a stream running down to the sea. The footpath runs along the back of the bay, but it’s easy to get down on to if you fancy a bit of exploration! Towards the back of the bay you’ll see a small caravan site.

4.  After leaving Porth Helaeth behind, continue following the winding coastal footpath, always moving forward, in a W/NW direction. In some sections the path is edged by hedges, on others, there are little steps - as well as sheer drops off to the side - and in some places you’ll cross grassy fields.

5.  Continue onwards, until you get to where the footpath turns SW, with a stone wall on the left, and kissing gate at the end. After passing through this you’ll find yourself heading north, past a property called ‘Moryn’, with a blue door in the wall here, and some impressive trees close by. Moryn sits to the side of another little bay, Porth Forllwyd with some outhouses/boathouses on the far side, as well as a small harbour wall. You’ll soon pass a second house, ‘Cae'r Borth’, situated at the back of the bay. From here, follow the path alongside it, with a high fence to your left, until you come out into an open field.

6.  Cross the field, heading in a N/NW direction, following the path all the way to the kissing gate on the other side, where you’ll be able to see Ynys Dulas in the distance. It marks the termination of an old limestone headland which (geologically) separates Dulas Bay from Lligwy, and Red Wharf Bay, respectively.

7.  After passing through the kissing gate, follow the path as it heads SW, where you’ll get fabulous views of Porth Lligwy. There will be a fence on your left, but sheer drops and/or bushes to the right. There’s a simple viewing bench along this section. Lligwy is popular with watersports enthusiasts, especially windsurfers, surfers and kitesurfers. So if it’s a windy day, you might be in for an arresting sight!

8.  Soon enough you’ll come to a section of coastline with a wooden walkway and steps, which help you navigate down this section of the headland. Once you drop back onto the footpath, keep going, heading east, along the side of the bay towards the back of the beach. You’ll often find bushes to your left, and sheer drops to the right. The views continue to be awe-inspiring!

9.  Continue along the footpath as it begins to take you down and round to Lligwy Beach. There are a number of rough steps to go down, as well as up before you get there! At one point there’s a little set the takes you off the path onto the beach. However, if you keep going on the main path, you’ll get to the car park and cafe. The River Lligwy runs out and across the sand on the northern side of the beach, and has a little wooden bridge crossing it.

10. End of your journey: After a refreshing drink at the beach cafe, and/or a tasty snack - as well as enjoying the delights of the beach - it’s time to head back to Moelfre! You need to head out of the car park onto the road. Continue up the little slope, past the caravan site on the right, and up to the crossroads, where you’ll see a postbox on the left. Take the left-hand turning, and keep going, passing a small quarry site, until you come to the Moelfre village sign. From here it’s easy to get back to the harbour by following this road into the village.

MOELFRE Anglesey

Below you'll find all the information you'll need to help you along with this walk; where to park, whether or not there are loos and if it's dog friendly.

Parking & access
  • Pay and display parking just behind Moelfre Harbour, LL72 8HL.

  • There’s some free roadside parking available in Moelfre village - but spaces get taken early.

  • There are car parks at either end of Lligwy Beach. If you stand in the middle of the beach, looking out to sea, you’ll find  one on the right (south), and one on the left (north). The northern end is quieter as there are no facilities. The one on the southern end is pay and display. You pay for it at the cafe, close to the entrance. 

  • All day from 9 am to 9 pm - £2.50.

  • Part day from 3 pm to 9 pm £1.50.

  • Overnight stays also need to be paid for - evening charge (5 pm to 9 pm) -  £0.50.

  • Easy access from both Moelfre and Lligwy’s carpark onto/off the bays.

Loos
  • Moelfre W/C: In the car park close to/behind beach - open 15th March - 31st October. It has baby changing and disabled facilities, as well as drinking water.

  • Lligwy WC: In the southern car park.

Dogs
  • Yes.
Places to eat
  • Ann’s Pantry, close to Moelfre Bay, is a local favourite, whether it’s for a mid-morning coffee, lunch, supper or a scrumptious afternoon tea. Make time to pay them a visit but do check that they’re open first!

  • The Kinmel Arms, just behind Moelfre Bay, LL72 8LL.

  • You’ll find lots of other options in Moelfre - including an ice cream vendor in the carpark - open in peak seasons!

  • Lligwy Beach Cafe caters for all your beach-treat needs. Usually open every day from Easter until the end of August. In September it’s open if the weather holds. From then on, only at weekends. Open again for the October half-term then, throughout the winter only open at weekends, unless the weather’s REALLY bad!

Itinerary

Disclaimer

You are responsible for your own safety when walking a suggested route. Only walk if you are medically able to. We make no representations or warranties as to the accuracy of the information on this site in relation to any of the suggested routes. While we try to ensure that all walking routes on this site are suitable and safe for walking by people of a reasonable level of experience and fitness, you should be aware that walking, like all outdoor activities, carries a degree of risk to person and property.

We accept no responsibility for loss or damage to personal effects, personal accident, injury or public liability in relation to a suggested route on this site (although we do not exclude or limit in any way our liability to you where it would be unlawful to do so). Furthermore, while we try to ensure that all suggested routes follow public rights of way, these are liable to change and you should ensure that all routes are rights of way at the time of walking. Please respect private property (including livestock), as we accept no responsibility for trespassing or damage to private property, to either you or any third party. Mountains and farmland are likely to be private property, please respect the landowners and their property. Please take extra care around traffic, farm machinery and livestock, and around steep drops on mountain or cliff paths.

Please walk within your group’s level of health, fitness and experience and follow advice from relevant authorities. Check the weather forecast (and, where relevant, tide timetables) in advance of a walk. Do not walk in adverse weather and always pack food, water, bright high-visibility warm and waterproof clothing, and a recent OS map, compass, torch and mobile phone. Proper footwear should be worn. Please let people know what time you are due to arrive at your destination. Children and pets should be supervised at all times, and dogs should be kept on a lead, particularly around farmland and livestock.

The contents of this site is provided for general information only. It is not intended to amount to advice on which you should rely. Where this site contains links to other sites and resources provided by third parties, these links are provided for your information only. Such links should not be interpreted as approval by us of those linked websites or information you may obtain from them. We have no control over the contents of those sites or resources.

If you do find any errors within any of our suggested routes, we would be grateful if you would let us know by emailing us at explore@menaiholidays.co.uk

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