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Unusual Things to do in North Wales

Think you’ve seen everything there is to see in North Wales? Think again! There are plenty of unusual things to do in North Wales to keep the whole family entertained.

With an array of hidden gems and unique attractions waiting to be discovered, your holiday in North Wales is sure to be one to remember. From zip-lining through slate caverns to visiting Britains smallest house, you’ll be spoilt for choice.

We all know that North Wales is home to impressive mountains, stunning coastlines and miles of woodlands. But have you experienced these unusual things to do in North Wales?


Unusual Things to do in Anglesey

1. Visit the Village with the Longest Place Name In Europe

The train station sign at Llanfair Pwllgwyngyll

With an impressive 58 letters, Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch is one of the longest village names in the world. Located on the beautiful island of Anglesey, the village was originally known as Llanfair Pwllgwyngyll.

However, its name was extended in the 1860s as a way of drawing in railway tourists. Many visitors now flock to Llanfair P.G. to take a photo next to the village’s oversized railway sign.


2. Discover the Healing Powers of St. Seiriol’s Well

St. Seiriol's Well in Penmon

With a history stretching back to the 6th century, Penmon was the site of a monastery established by St Seiriol. A tranquil location found on the tip of Anglesey, Penmon is the home to St. Seiriol’s Well.

Thought to be the oldest remains of the monastery, St. Seiriol’s Well is said to have healing powers and was often visited by pilgrims. The well can still be accessed today by walking up a path past an idyllic fish pond built by the monks.


If you’re looking for a place to stay whilst exploring these unusual attractions, check out these holiday cottages in Anglesey.


Unusual Things to do in Snowdonia

3. Experience Adventure at the Slate Caverns

Snowdonia's slate caverns

The Caverns is a challenging underground course and a fantastic way to discover North Wales’s slate history. Set in a historic slate mine, the course takes up to 3 hours to complete as you venture through tunnels and chasms via zip-lines, tightropes and more.

Being completely underground, the Caverns is a perfect rainy-day activity in North Wales, located in the heart of Snowdonia National Park. Are you ready to put your bravery to the test?


4. Explore an Italianate fantasy village

views of portmeirion and North Wales

Located on the edge of Snowdonia National Park, on the coast of Wales, lies the charming village of Portmeirion. This enchanting Italian inspired village was created by Welsh architect, Sir Clough Williams-Ellis.

Spend a morning strolling through the picturesque piazza, enjoy the white sandy beaches along the Dwyryd Estuary or grab an ice cream from an authentic Italian style gelateria. If you’d like to discover the delights of this magical village, why not stay in one of these holiday cottages near Portmeirion.


5. Visit Gelert’s Grave

Gelert's Grave in Beddgelert

Beddgelert, a place of legend, is located in the heart of Snowdonia and is home to Gelert’s Grave. The stone monument marks the resting place of Prince Llewelyn the Great’s faithful hound. According to this beloved Welsh folk tale, Prince Llywelyn went hunting and returned home to find his precious hound covered in blood and his son missing.

The Prince, assuming that his favourite dog had killed his heir, took a sword to Gelert’s heart. In the aftermath of killing his beloved hound, The Prince heard a cry and found his son underneath the upturned cradle, alongside a wolf that Gelert had killed.


Looking for accommodation in the area? Check out these cottages in Snowdonia, providing the perfect place to explore these hidden gems!


Unusual Things to do in Llandudno and Conwy

6. Visit the Smallest House in Britain, Quay House

quay house. The smallest house in Britain

If you’re looking for an unusual thing to do in North Wales, why not visit the smallest house in Great Britain. Quay House is nestled among a terrace of houses on Conwy’s quayside. Measuring just 72 inches wide and 122 inches high, this national treasure has recently been refurbished and is definitely worth a visit if you’re enjoying a holiday in Conwy.


7. Ride The Great Orme Tramway

The Great Orme Tramway in Llandudno

Climbing 1500m up through the Great Orme Country Park on the Great Orme Tramway is one of our favourite things to do in Llandudno. This unique tramway ride begins at Victoria Station and takes you on a journey like no other to the Great Orme’s spectacular summit.

The Great Orme Tramway is the only cable-hauled tramway on a public road in Great Britain and was first opened in 1902. The views from the top are truly stunning, reaching as far as the Isle of Man and the Lake District.


8. Witness a Living Survivor from Prehistoric Times

The Llangernyw Yew Tree

On the grounds of St Digain’s Church in Llangernyw village stands the ancient Llangernyw Yew Tree, which was already over 2,000 years old when Jesus Christ was born! In fact, it is estimated to have germinated in the Bronze Age, making it 4,000 – 5,000 years old. The tree’s significance wasn’t realised until the 1990s before it was finally made one of 50 Great British Trees by the Tree Council.


Looking for a place to stay? These Llandudno holiday cottages are a great choice for anyone visiting these unusual things to do in Llandudno.


Unusual Things to do in North East Wales

9. Canoe along the “Stream in the Sky”

Image of Pontcysyllte Aquaduct from the top

An architectural masterpiece, the Pontcysyllte Aquaduct is truly astonishing. This amazing structure stands 126 feet high, carrying the Llangollen Canal over the River Dee. You can cross by foot, canal boat, or even on a canoe! No matter how you choose to enjoy this World Heritage Site, don’t forget your camera as there are gorgeous views from every angle. Designed by Thomas Telford, the Pontcysyllte Aquaduct is a fantastic free attraction in North Wales.


10. See the First Welsh Bible at Chirk Castle

Chirk Castle and Grounds

Chirk Castle is home to the William Morgan Bible, the first Bible to ever be translated into Welsh. William Morgan was born in 1545, a son of John ap Morgan and Lowri, farmers and tenants of Maurice Wynn. Young William was sent off to Gwydir Castle to be educated alongside the landlord’s children.

From here, William went on to spend 10 years studying Greek and Hebrew at Cambridge. Following the request from Elizabeth I, William Morgan began the 10-year process of translating the Bible into Welsh. Only around 24 copies of the original bibles are known to have survived, one of which is proudly displayed at Chirk Castle.


We hope you enjoyed reading our collection of unusual things to do in North Wales! If you’re looking for some extra inspiration then check out these 10 things to do with kids in North Wales or our 10 favourite places to visit on the Llyn Peninsula.


Image Credits: Robin Drayton (CC BY-SA 2.0) and (Jeff Buck CC BY-SA 2.0)

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